The Animal Kingdom We Live In

Jul 17

distant-traveller:

SN 1006 supernova remnant

A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth’s sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000 light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)

distant-traveller:

SN 1006 supernova remnant

A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth’s sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000 light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)

(Source: apod.nasa.gov, via dallinology)

Jul 06

[video]

Jun 18

Fungal protein found to cross blood-brain barrier -

neurosciencestuff:

In a remarkable series of experiments on a fungus that causes cryptococcal meningitis, a deadly infection of the membranes that cover the spinal cord and brain, investigators at UC Davis have isolated a protein that appears to be responsible for the fungus’ ability to…

(Source: ucdmc.ucdavis.edu)

[video]

Jun 17

goddess-of-smut:

Mouth of leatherback turtle

goddess-of-smut:

Mouth of leatherback turtle

(Source: goddessoftheblackcoast, via evolvinglogic)

Jun 08

(Source: thirst-for-wonder, via dallinology)

Jun 05

thenewenlightenmentage:

Colorful Hubble Telescope Image Is Best-Ever View of Universe’s Evolution

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured an amazing and colorful deep view of the universe, showing galaxies shining in ultraviolet light during their wild, star-forming “teenage” years.
The new image, which was released today (June 3), is themost comprehensive view of the evolving universe ever captured by the space telescope, Hubble representatives said. Hubble previously imaged the same patch of sky shown in the new image between 2004 and 2009 to create a super-detailed view known as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field.
Continue Reading

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. Rafelski (IPAC/Caltech), A. Koekemoer (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and Z. Levay (STScI)

thenewenlightenmentage:

Colorful Hubble Telescope Image Is Best-Ever View of Universe’s Evolution

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured an amazing and colorful deep view of the universe, showing galaxies shining in ultraviolet light during their wild, star-forming “teenage” years.

The new image, which was released today (June 3), is themost comprehensive view of the evolving universe ever captured by the space telescope, Hubble representatives said. Hubble previously imaged the same patch of sky shown in the new image between 2004 and 2009 to create a super-detailed view known as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field.

Continue Reading

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. Rafelski (IPAC/Caltech), A. Koekemoer (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and Z. Levay (STScI)

(via mindblowingscience)

Jun 03

frontal-cortex:

Scanning electron microscope picture of a nerve ending that has been broken open to reveal the synaptic vesicles beneath the cell membrane.
Image by Tina Carvalho. The Cell: An Image Library

frontal-cortex:

Scanning electron microscope picture of a nerve ending that has been broken open to reveal the synaptic vesicles beneath the cell membrane.

Image by Tina Carvalho. The Cell: An Image Library

(Source: blogs.libraries.iub.edu, via mindblowingscience)

May 18

[video]

May 16

[video]

[video]

Feb 07

[video]

Jul 30

[video]

[video]

Jul 09




How a face forms in the womb

How a face forms in the womb

(via pingisland)